Intrinsically

In just a few short months we have been confronted with the terms of essential and nonessential; we have witnessed the murder of a citizen by law enforcement; we have seen women’s abuse being dismissed by the influential. And now we are hearing the voices of a weary people crying out. But what are they actually saying?

From ME TOO! to BLACK LIVES MATTER! to masked sign wavers declaring ALL WORK IS ESSENTIAL! citizens are desperate to be considered important. We have created a culture where a person’s worth is determined by someone else. The factors that are taken into consideration are social status, wealth, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity and religion. This results in favor being shown to whoever checks the correct boxes or the most boxes. In an attempt to balance the discrimination that runs rampant in our land, the pendulum usually swings violently in the opposite direction. Special access and unique privileges are now granted to the groups that experience the most discrimination. Is this the solution?

We seem to be of the opinion that peace will come when we are all the same. Perhaps when all men behave like women or when the wealthy give all their money away or when white citizens no longer hold positions of power things will be better. Maybe when we level out the playing field fairness will return to the game. This, however, is simply a reversal of the current problem. It continues the trend of declaring some more valuable than others. It avoids the real issue: the heart.

We seem to have forgotten that no two people are exactly the same. Each of us is unique in some way and is designed with a particular purpose. Men shouldn’t have to hang their heads in shame for not being women. Citizens shouldn’t feel like they need to apologize because of the color of their skin. What needs to happen is a recognition of Who placed us all here on this planet in the first place. Earth’s citizens are consumed with themselves, their wants, and their needs and are avoiding the truth that they are accountable to God for the posture of their hearts. We are experiencing the consequences of this sin crisis.

Unity in our nation will only come when our society chooses to set aside the labels that divide in order to celebrate the differences that make us stronger. We need to recognize the intrinsic worth of every beating heart in our land, beginning with the unborn. We make a mockery of justice when we wave signs calling for equality for all and then defend the slaughter of millions of babies because of the circumstances of their conception. Ultimately, we must individually repent for how we have devalued life and minimized our Creator’s sovereignty; we must step down from our thrones and bow before His instead.

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#5 Turns #1

I remember envisioning God’s hand guiding you through the birth canal and into my arms as I labored through the intensity of transition. And then there you were! Our tiniest boy! I wondered what it would be like to raise a third son. Your older brothers are each distinct in their own ways; would you be like them or different?

This past year with you has proven that you are uniquely yourself. You have completely stolen the heart of every member of our family as we all fight over whose turn it is to cuddle you, feed you, play with you or fetch your favorite blanket for you. In spite of being such a petite little fellow, you bellow and scream with the best of them, staunchly defending your personal space and property.

In just the last few weeks you figured out how to propel your little body with your arms from one end of the room to the other; your two bottom teeth popped out and you learned how to clap! Every accomplishment causes you to beam with such pride; it’s almost as adorable as your cheery “Hi!” paired with an eager opening and closing of your tiny raised hand.

Simeon, as delighted as I am by your growth and development, and as eager as I am to have conversations with you and to learn life through your eyes, I am content to keep you small for the time being. Burying my face in your fuzzy, strawberry blond hair, snuggling you in my arms, and soaking in your baby giggles are things I look forward to every day. It seems like your babyhood has been the most savored one to date- perhaps because I am sharing it with so many other people. More than once this week I have heard your siblings comment to one other: “I can’t believe his birthday is coming! He is growing up! He is going to be one!”

Tomorrow on your birthday I am going to study you even more; I am going to snuggle you even longer; and I am going to cherish even deeper how you pop your thumb in your mouth when I scoop you up, smirk just a little and then lay your head sideways on my shoulder. Being one doesn’t have to change everything just yet.

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A Walk with Jane Austen by Lori Smith

This is a winning read for anyone who adores Jane Austen and descriptions of a walk through England, has wrestled with singleness or had debilitating health issues that led to serious depression.

The candor with which the author writes is refreshing and heartwarming. It stirs the reader to compassion and also introspection. Her faithful accounts of emotional ups and downs from one day to the next can leave the reader encouraged because God’s constancy was present no matter how the author was feeling.

After reading this book the reader will also feel more connected to Jane Austen by better understanding why she wrote the way she did and how she managed to leave such an impact in spite of living a simple and relatively brief life so long ago.

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Disconnected to be Reconnected

2020 was one of the first years that I felt nervous about beginning (as if I had a choice). I found it difficult to settle on resolutions because 2019 repeatedly taught me that “man makes his plans but the Lord directs his steps,” although in my case it often felt like my children were the ones changing my plans. I didn’t want to set myself up for more frustration.

I also didn’t feel prepared. We were blessed with an abundance of beloved company from October through January, but all good intentions about maintaining routines are usually set aside for the sake of memory-making with visitors. Over Christmas, Jared and I didn’t get the time to sit and plan and discuss our personal and shared visions for the new year. In some ways, I felt like I was entering this brand new decade blind except for knowing of certain challenges ahead – which didn’t serve to help me feel peaceful.

Thanks to a dear friend wanting to do Cultivate’s Powersheets with me this year, I am doing them for a third year in a row. Through the prepatory work, I settled on CONTENTMENT as my word for the year. As I pondered how to strive to live out this word, I realized that the steps towards being content could become my resolutions. I would like to reduce the amount of cravings in my life: sugar cravings, material cravings, and approval cravings. I desire to increase my appreciation for what I have: relationships with family and friends, the beautiful outdoors, a home filled with lovely items, a personal library stocked with books beckoning to be read, a tea hutch with a rich selection of inviting tea. Finally, I hope to cultivate simplicity which will offer me the time to savor what I have rather than fighting the frenzy that can easily overtake me when my expectations are all too high.

My “plan” for the new year involves two main steps: disconnect from social media and reconnect with Jesus. When my thumb is scrolling, I can feel my mind buzzing with unnecessary noise and my heart growing restless. I start viewing my person, my home, my children, and my life with a critical eye as I compare it to the perfect squares on my screen. That quickly spirals into extra spending, bitterness, and frustration as I frantically try to make my life meet social media standards.  What I really need to do is fill my spare moments with intentional prayer, refreshing reading, and focused time reveling in the bounty within my home.

This doesn’t mean I will never hop on Facebook or check on Instagram – I enjoy sneaking a peek here and there. But it does mean that it will no longer be my priority. I want to be connected with the things that mean the most to me when I am eighty-years old and by that time I highly doubt that I’ll be counting ‘Likes’ on my posts.

How do you feel about this brand new decade?

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Let’s Talk About It (Part 2)

In my previous post I delved into the looming topic of depression and promised to promptly provide a part two. However, the sequel was delayed because shortly after writing my post I plummeted into a difficult time and it has been a slow climb out of it. I hesitated to write a post with answers to depression when I myself was struggling with their implementation. A couple of close friends urged me to write anyway, as my thoughts could still help someone else; not long after, I felt the prompting of the Holy Spirit that the time had come to write the second part.

In my experience and comparing notes with others regarding theirs, I have discovered that living through a cycle of depression requires an eclectic collection of strategies. For some that collection might include counseling or medication; mine consists of the pursuit of:

  • Acceptance. Depression in and of itself is not bad. It is our mind’s way of telling us that something in our life or body is not well. Change is required and we must make time to find out what that is. The longer we deny the depression, thinking it’s wrong, the deeper it settles in because we then add guilt to our already burdened minds. It’s much better to acknowledge our situation and then work towards finding a solution.
  • Beauty. The other night I made time for a candlelit bubble bath. In the flickering candlelight I couldn’t see the dust on my shutters or the clutter of bath toys around me. An aura of serenity surrounded me and I was peaceful. I realized how important it is to focus on the beautiful- and it can always be found. Perhaps it’s in a laughter-filled conversation with a friend or a multi-colored nourishing meal arrayed on your plate or a dance party with your children or a walk at a sunset. Beauty prompts our minds to see the other side of life that depression’s darkness tries to cover up from our view.
  • The good. As a Christ-follower I know that all things work together for my good and God’s glory- even depression. In the midst of the turmoil I strive to acknowledge the good I can see coming from it: the solidarity between me and fellow sufferers is one; the lifestyle changes I make to lessen my stress is another. I find myself clinging to simple blessings and I am more aware of the sorrow that others are experiencing. I have been convicted of how quick I am to judge others when I know so little of the struggles they might be having in their own minds. As a Christian, I know that depression is not wasted.
  • Jesus. Sometimes during depression we feel like our spiritual health is also plummeting. We wonder why God seems so distant or assume that if He was close we wouldn’t be so afflicted. But I am coming to the conclusion that He is never more ready to hold us closer than when we are depressed. It simply takes us asking. Half the battle of depression lies in turning on the worship song or reading that first verse in the Bible or in breathing out the words, “save me, Jesus!” From there the process of healing begins.

I am always adding to my collection, but these have been helpful to me of late. They aren’t curing me once and for all; I don’t know if I’ll ever be depression-free. The point isn’t so much in reaching that happy place of no difficulty in life as it is in being willing to learn and grow and rejoice in the midst of the hardship.

If you are in a time of darkness right now please don’t hesitate to reach out to someone, especially to Jesus.

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God IS in the Details

For the past couple of months I’ve been doing a study of Psalms with a lovely group of young ladies. Each day the leader of the study sends out the Psalm of the day via text and each group member reads it and shares her reflections (via text). This has been a rich study for me because it has brought me back to Psalms, a book whose relevance I’ve somewhat overlooked.

Throughout my reading I have noted a transparency between the psalmist and the Almighty. In the midst of immense affliction the psalmist does not hesitate to cry out, to despair, to plead for mercy or even revenge; the psalmist also always returns to the character of God: His goodness, His provision, His power, and His awareness of the human plight.

In a recent conversation with my mom, she and I considered the pandemic and the tumult surrounding it. I told her that I wish the politics of the issue wouldn’t overshadow the genuine threat of the disease itself. It is all too easy for citizens to make this a political issue and thus minimize the suffering of those who have been directly harmed by this hidden enemy. I believe Christians need to be the first to set politics and personal opinions aside and reach out to the hurting with the sincerest compassion. How do we do this?

By recognizing the constancy of God in the swirling chaos of the planet. We can practice compassion and selflessness by remembering Christ’s example as He traversed the cities and countryside of Rome-controlled Israel. We can keep politics in its proper place by keeping God in His: sovereign even over the actions and plans of the worst of men. And we can be transparent before our Creator as we acknowledge our emotions and then acknowledge that He is even more real than they.

Personally, I can see much good coming to my family through all the COVID-19 related disruption. I also see the devastation and loss others are experiencing all around me (including the death of a neighbor from the virus). Can both the good and the bad be simultaneously true? Absolutely. Because God, in His sovereignty, is enacting His will at a universal, international, national, community, church, family and individual level simultaneously. We can catch a glimpse of this through the study of world history, but only a glimpse. It will take an eternity of sitting at His feet to even begin to grasp His mind, but at least then we will have all the time in the world.

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A Mother’s Day Reflection

Recently I was thinking about all the things I’ve done in the past and all the things I would like to do in the future. I asked my husband if all of my accomplishments really mattered after all. Were they having an impact on my life now? And in the midst of it all I wondered how to describe myself just as me, separate from my roles in other people’s lives.

As I sit outside soaking in the evening sun glimmering on the ripples of the lake, savoring the light breeze as it plays with the leaves and carries butterflies toward our flowers, and listening to my children shriek with delight while they swing and play, I conclude that my identity is not entirely lost. I continue to find delight in absorbing the outdoors or getting lost in a good book. I still prefer tea over coffee and try to sneak in a bite of chocolate in the late afternoon. I love the thrill of an amazing find while thrifting and am convinced that dragonflies are truly fairy steeds. And I’m starting to see these idiosyncrasies popping up in the little people around me.

I smile as the children and I create detailed imaginings about the fairy world; when we go on walks someone is always commenting on the beautiful flowers we pass or listening for birdcalls. Books are forever being hid under bedcovers for late night reading and the letter-writing tradition is being received with pen-eager fingers. It leads me to believe that the past helped shape who I am presently and bits of me are being imprinted in the hearts and minds of my children. And all the while, their raising is shaping who I will be tomorrow.

I suppose that’s what it means to be a mother: a continual giving and receiving of all we hold most dear.

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The Cross and Corona

During this season of being still, being advised to stay home and learning what is essential, I’ve wondered where the Cross comes into the picture. I’ve pondered what the best approach is: faith or preparedness; concern or nonchalance; soul-searching, finger-pointing, or conspiracy-theorizing. What does Christ desire of me? Does a heavenly focus change earthly circumstances?

It’s very easy to need to know the latest headline or to become consumed with buying extra while you can and then worrying if you forgot something. There’s the fear that causes doors to be shut and distances kept. But then I read my Bible and am reminded that His truths never change. There is still gospel seed to be sown; there are still people to love; and God is still faithful to provide.

This morning I walked outside for a bit of fresh, cool air. It was a stressful morning of slow moving, cranky kids and mountains of laundry. The sky was overcast and I felt ragged before the day had even started. I was also aware of the Cross and wanting that to mold my perspective today. The thought came to me that in this meta narrative of Time, God’s sovereignty works on a universal scale as well as in intricately personal ways. And overall the gospel stands supreme.

Just as in times of crises hundreds of years ago, God guided and moved and changed the structure of civilization to achieve His will and He is doing the same today. He also sanctifies His people in the midst of all of it. He calls us to pray, to read more of His word, to remember the overlooked, to rejoice in Him always, to be grateful and to think more highly of others than ourselves (especially the ones within our walls). Those things remain the same, virus or no virus.

Personally, my sanctification involves:

  • An increased time of devotions and training our children to do the same.
  • Seeing afresh that my children are amazing individuals and I want to really get to know them.
  • Appreciating the opportunity to be resourceful and creative.
  • Delighting in an open schedule with no pressing obligations outside the home.
  • Practicing patience, patience, and a little more patience.
  • Respecting historical figures SO much more because of all they endured.
  • Being willing to be selfless when I most want to be selfish.
  • Recognizing that my husband is his own person with a set amount of time God has entrusted to him. It is not correct of me to dictate or judge how he spends his time; it is between him and God. I am excited to see how God shapes him during this season.

In conclusion, I don’t know how or why all of this is happening or when it will all conclude. I don’t know what God is planning for the Church or even for individuals outside of my home. But I do know that being surrendered to His purposes is the safest and most peaceful place to be in the storm.

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Thoughts After my Birthday

How is it possible for a single day to carry such definition? Perhaps for some of my readership your birthdays are just another day; for me they are a time of reflection and evaluation. Though there are few specific birthdays that I remember with clarity, each one has carried significance for me within its year.

This year’s birthday is not unique in that regard. A handful of years from now I will probably not remember what I ate on my 35th birthday nor what gifts I received, yet it was special just the same. Landing on a Monday, it still carried a touch of the Monday blues; laundry was done and the kitchen cleaned. Babies needed changing and hungry tummys demanded feeding; sibling squabbles were mediated and toddler mishaps tended to. A younger me would have fallen into that gaping hole of self-pity, frustrated that I wasn’t able to have breakfast in bed or a day free of chores. However, my birthday self recognized that this time with my children was a gift in itself and the selfless efforts of my husband to celebrate me were indeed the sacrifices of a tired, but loving heart. I cherish them and all of the kind words sent my way yesterday.

I was gifted some time to sit and reflectively journal and I think that the greatest area of growth in my personal development is in the understanding that life is a series of experiences. Even the most painful hardships are great opportunities to experience deeper levels of life. One never knows how today’s joys or mishaps will impact our steps and word tomorrow. In addition, I have also been making more efforts to live according to my priorities, whether that is in turning worries into prayers or being selective in the expenditure of my time.

And to conclude on a light-hearted note, I think I would describe my newly 35-year old self as someone who prefers tea over coffee, wants more time in books but hasn’t figured out how to avoid the need for screen time, craves sunny breezes, loves a successful day of garage sales or thrifting, and delights in a well- planned schedule.

What thoughts do you have on your birthday?

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The Yoke

This yoke of life is heavy,

The burden presses down.

In every step I’m weary,

Tears my only sound.

Marriages in crisis,

Babies ill too young.

Familiar disappearing,

Farewells remain too long.

The needs outweigh my energy,

Time slips through my hands.

I long to pour out joyfully,

But sorrow is in command.

Dear Jesus take this heavy yoke,

It weighs too much for me.

Please transform all that’s broke,

Into gentleness and humility.

Help me walk in step with you,

Not far ahead or way behind, only side-by-side.

Sustain me daily with all that’s true

And in your strength may I rely.

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Let’s Talk About It (Part 1)

I experience depression. There. I’ve said it. It’s not an easy topic to discuss but I believe it is an important one. In my journey towards contentment depression is a significant obstacle and has consumed much of my mental and emotional energy. I have read about it; listened to podcasts discussing it; shared with my inner circle and heard their testimonies related to it; sought counsel from my midwife regarding it. Most of all, I have pored over Scripture and prayed for healing and freedom from this burden. I’ve learned that there are many causes of depression and a range of emotions connected with it, including:  shame, sorrow, weariness. However, there is always hope. 
I think there are as many types and experiences of depression as there are strains of the flu and it is nearly impossible for anyone to say to someone else, “I know exactly what you are going through.” Depression can be prompted by spiritual trials, physical conditions, chemical imbalances, trauma, loss…and everything in between. It can be as simple as deep gloom for a day or as intense as years of struggling to get out of bed in the morning. Personally, I went through years of depression from my middle school years to early college. After having my first child I experienced a minor case of postpartum depression and ever since I have waves of intense darkness that are rarely predictable.  I’ve discovered that it is difficult to talk openly about my experience because I feel:
  • Shame. I am a Christian! I love Jesus! I should know better than to believe the lies that bombard my mind and bring me down. I have good health, a loving husband, fantastic children, a beautiful home, friends in abundance. How ungrateful of me to be wallowing in this darkness and despair. There are people genuinely suffering all around me and I have the audacity to be depressed! Shame on me! What will people think of me if they knew? Now they’ll know that I really don’t have it all together all the time.
  • Sorrow. Oh! All the missed opportunites for joy when I am stuck in the mire of despair. I am so alone in the cloud and it prevents me from truly absorbing the life that is mine. Depression isolates and it is gut-wrenching to feel so close yet so far away from the ones you adore.
  • Weariness. Depression is exhausting. At times I can sense the cloud coming and I do all I can to resist it, but I’m not always successful and the effort to fight wears me down. Other times it consumes without warning and the blanket of despair is so heavy I don’t even want to attempt to push it off of me.  In these times, the last thing I want is an onslaught of “you should’s” or “you shouldn’t’s” or “if you only’s.” I hesitate to open up because I don’t want to sound rude or ungrateful or embittered by the lack of understanding. And so I withdraw and battle silently.
That is a glimpse into one side of my depression experience. It’s rough and not pretty. It is the human side of human me. It’s what I don’t want to be the first thing people think about when they see me. I don’t want people to pity me or think that I’m not happy with the life God has entrusted to me. It’s not that at all. The fact remains that I am but dust and in the midst of a beautiful life there is the burden of living for eternity in a temporal world. The struggle of fallen and heavenbound remains. Heavenbound! That is where hope lies and next time I will share how I know I am not truly alone when I experience depression. Every time I come through. Every. Single. Time. 
If you have a depression story and feel comfortable sharing, please do!
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The Third Three

Everyone who knows this child agrees that she is not easily intimidated: by adults, peers, boundaries, rules, new flavors, new experiences or unlearned lessons. If there is any challenge to be had, she heads straight for it; given 2 options, she picks a third; expected to say yes, she will say no, but when you want her to say no, yes is the first word out of her mouth. She is probably the most challenging 2-year old we have parented so far.

When describing Arden, we say that she is very much like a cat: she manages to squeeze into the most obscure spot on the couch, pull her blankets and pillows all around her, pop her thumb in her mouth, twirl her hair with her free hand, and become completely relaxed. Usually she is the child wedged closest to us, but if we lather her with too much affection she leaves. She wants attention, but on her terms.  I often ponder how to best handle her obstinance and tantrums. Are they simply her will rising or are they indicators of unmet needs? Each day seems to be a new experiment as we try new ways to reach her little heart.

I absolutely adore this little girl. All of her put together is quite mesmerizing, from the way her mouth puckers when she talks, to her little voice and adorable pronunication of certain words, to her half-head nod when she affirms what she wants to her infamous hair twirl and thumbsuck, to her iconic mismatched outfits and flipflopped shoes to her surprise stashes of household goods in her bright orange backpack. It is not unusual for me to blink an extra time as I look at her and realize she is my little girl. I become all too consumed in the mothering of this child that I lose touch with getting to know her as an individual person. She was once my infant in arms; she was once learning to walk; she was once babbing her first words. In just three short years, she moved across the country, became a big sister TWICE, was potty-trained, learned the A-B-C song, and recognizes the letter, A, just to highlight a few of the important happenings in her young life. And it all happened in such a short time.

As Arden begins a brand new year, I want her to keep dancing when she hears music. I want her to keep hopping instead of walking from point A to point B. I want her to keep giving the tightest hugs. I want her to keep wanting to snuggle with me at nap time. I want her to keep sucking her thumb and twirling her hair and stuffing her bright orange backpack with unexpected items. I want her to have to her own style and to think her own thoughts. And somehow I want to show her heart that obedience is a good thing, that there is joy and freedom found in boundaries, and that there is a proper time to say no.  I think that this third child of ours has shown me more than anybody that there is no such thing as a parenting formula. Every day truly is a new parenting experience and the only way to parent well is to be in constant communication with Jesus and Jared. I rest in the knowledge that Jesus chose to gift us with the firecracker of a little girl and I KNOW He knows what He is doing.
The happiest of third birthdays to our one and only, Fervent Melody of Joy. May Jesus be the keeper of your heart and soul from today into eternity.

 

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Regret or Rejoice?

The day I dreaded since the day she arrived is today. After a rich, 6-week long visit with us that encompassed Quinley’s 4th birthday, a garage sale, Thanksgiving, Christmas decorating and the first day of Advent, my mom had to leave. My initial reaction was sorrow over all the things we still didn’t find time to do or all the moments when we weren’t chatting or at least in the same room together. I’m just wired to focus on what I haven’t accomplished or could have done better and that means regret is usually my first emotion felt after a positive experience.

But then I prompted myself to review my favorite memories through all of my senses. I realized that even if we weren’t always talking or spending time together, I was still absorbing the fact that she was in our home. I came up with quite a list in just a few short minutes:

    I cherished seeing her all snuggly on my couch or tidying up the kitchen.
    I liked seeing her special things spread throughout the guest room, proving she felt at home.
    I feel comfort in wearing the clothes she folded.
    I hugged her tightly, feeling how fragile and strong she is at the same time.
    I savored feeling her hand touching my arm and watching her embrace the children.
    I enjoyed hearing her singing or chatting with the children, her door opening and closing, the radio on in her room, and her visiting with the pets.
    I savored the taste of her omelette and sandwiches and the tea she would brew for me.
    And there is nothing like the sweet Mom smell- many comforting scents all mingled together.

I’m human and had my share of bad days while she here, but I did my best to not take the gift of her presence for granted. Gregory-Hans recently declared that God is bigger than everything, even bad guys. Sometimes those bad guys are feelings of fear, regret, anxiety or despair. It’s necessary to look for a reason to rejoice in all things because in doing so we remember how great and good our God is. I want to practice choosing to rejoice.

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Thankful

I’ve been itching to blog ever since I stepped into my blogging sabbatical so I decided to return for a moment. I’m sure I’ll have something to write for Christmas too.

Lately I’ve been thinking about specifics. I see how bland generalities really are and how humans are drawn to details. It’s the details of life that inspire and make a difference: the colors which make the rainbow; the varying shades of green and blue of the Pacific Ocean that cause it to dazzle; the subtle grin my husband has that makes my heart skip a little.

I know I am thankful for many things but instead of merely listing general categories I want to share specifically why I am thankful for these things:

~Salvation: it’s no small thing to know that my sins no longer stand between me and the Almighty God. When I die, I can stand spotless before His throne because Jesus took my place on the cross. Until then, I am growing in my relationship with Jesus through the gift of His Word, the Bible. For this I am thankful.

~Family: there is nothing quite like having my own people who I can dedicate my life to loving and serving. Each one of them is my dream come true. I yearned for a husband who would be my best friend and faithful listener and steady confidant. I ached for my very own babies to fill my arms. And now all of these people fill my home with their laughter, their tears, their silly antics, their warmth, their chaos, and their mutual love for me. These 6 people need me and for this I am thankful.

~Nature: the peace that only comes from being outside and absorbing the fragrance of fresh air, glimpsing the sunlight dancing off the varying shades of green, hearing the various birds chatting about their day. For this I am thankful.

~Friendship: I am blessed with friends from all walks of life and corners of the world. Each one helps me to see life with fresh perspective and my closest circle, my mom tribe, holds me accountable in my efforts to live intentionally. Life would have less dimension without friendship and for mine I am thankful.

~Books: my brain would shrivel up without the opportunity to step into fresh realms of thought. I never regret opening up any one of the books from the piles near my bed and reading a page or ten. For this I am thankful.

My list could go on and on ranging from tasty food to hobbies to employment to second chances and forgiveness to…you get the idea. This Thanksgiving let’s all immerse ourselves in the details of life and take time to mention specifics. For what are you thankful? Be specific.

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This Season We Are In

There is something about the seasons that prompts me to write about them. I have written thoughts about them in the past (seasons of friendship, for example) and I have a feeling there will be more thoughts to come in the future. I am certain that we can all pair an annual season with a phase in our current life.

With the crispness of autumn teasing us (in Florida we keep our swimsuits next to our winter coats), I am more aware of seasons changing. And with my mom gifting us with her time and love and presence in our home for the entire month of November, I am confronted with the speed of passing time. It hurts. I am intent on savoring the little years with our children but I’ve been negligent with the older years of our parents.

It struck me the other day that while our children are in the spring of their lives, our parents are in the autumn of theirs. I’ve been in denial because I want to assume that they will remain the constants they have always been to me. They’ve been the anchors of my existence that I have more than once resented but upon which I counted in every storm. Even as a married woman with five babies of my own I can live with more confidence knowing my parents are there. It’s impossible for me to imagine life any other way.

But autumn is a glorious season filled with vibrant colors, crisp air and cozy nights with fuzzy blankets, warm drinks and long conversations. It’s a time of anticipating the beautiful memories to be made at Christmas and a time to reflect on the passing year and make good on those nearly-forgotten resolutions from January. (In Florida, autumn can almost last into the new year.) And so I pray it will be for this season we are in as a family: spring and summer and autumn linking arms, savoring the moments together, and making memories that will carry us through the chill that will come at some point in our lives.

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Dear Quinley

On the eve of your fourth birthday I want you to know that:

When your smile dances in your eyes

And you giggle from head to toe,

When you slip your little hand into mine

And announce you have a surprise to show,

When you faithfully help with every chore on my list

And soothe the babies just like I do,

When you pucker your lips for a good night kiss

And tuck your beloved dolly next to you,

When your comforting words soothe hurting hearts

And you bless your penpals with hand drawn cards,

When you burst into songs of your own creation

And dance with joy and freedom,

You’re the epitome of girlhood innocence,

The image of childhood delight.

Like butterflies floating on a sunbeam,

You bring wonder into life.

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Sabbatical

Hello Faithful Readership,

Writing is in my blood and is integral to my personality and identity. With that said, I am feel the need to take a step back from blogging for the remainder of the year for several reasons.

I have some hurt I need to work through; some flourishing friendships I want to cultivate more; an abundance of visitors coming; an eagerly anticipated visit from my mom that I want to savor; and of course, the treasured holiday season to prepare for and enjoy. I wish to be present for all of this in order to glean and hear and grow in all the ways God wants me to.

I have a feeling that I will have more words and thoughts to exchange with you in the new year and I may hop on here (for sure for the next birthday child) a time or two before then. In the meantime, please know I care about all who read this and I want to be back but I also need to pause for a season.

Thank you for understanding and for your prayers.

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A Philosophy of Education Part 4: A Body-Supported Mind

In this final segment of my education series I am considering an obvious, but often overlooked, element of a child’s learning: the wellness of the body. There seems to be a disconnect in popular education between the body and the mind. Youngsters are told to eat their veggies but fast food is sold in cafeterias; they are told to move but recess and p.e. have nearly disappeared from many schools; they are told to rest but TVs and cell phones are put in their bedrooms for around-the-clock entertainment.

I believe that a healthy body is critical to a thriving mind. Body maintenance is comprised of three elements: adequate rest, a balanced diet, and regular exercise. Because learning is a lifestyle that must be cultivated with intentionality, so most healthy living. I can’t expect the children to sit for any length of time with focused attention if they only had 8 hours of sleep (they need 10-12), weren’t outside at all and ate sugar cereal for breakfast. Our routine is designed with time spent outdoors, scheduled opportunities for rest and breaks for low sugar food.

Most of all, however, we want our children to have a healthy view of themselves and their bodies. They are wonderful creations, image-bearers of the Almighty God. This means that it is honored work to care for their bodies and it is a privileged duty to treat themselves and each other with respect. This fourth posture, that of the body, begins with us, their parents. Are we willing to commit the time required to be intentional stewards of these five little bodies in our care? And are we modeling that stewardship with our own bodies and minds?

As I conclude my philosophy of education I am reminded that whole education should reflect the whole person: body, mind and spirit. And in the process of teaching I myself will never stop learning.

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Mystic Sweet Communion

Jane Kirkpatrick skillfully weaves the personal story of Ivy Cromartie Stranahan with the history of Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This beautiful yet powerful historical fiction reminds its readers that history is made by individuals and defines individuals. Things that can be mentioned in passing, like illness, hurricanes or financial discrepancies can actually change the course of history. And the decisions one person makes for the sake of others can rescue an entire people group. The weaving of words in this book has inspired me to look differently at my life and to see Florida with new eyes.

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A Philosophy of Education Part 3: Never Cease Learning

From the moment they take their first breath, children have a desire to learn. It’s innate; an instinct over which they have no control. This is how they learn language, how to engage with the people around them and what their place is in society. They absorb, observe, imitate and master in a continuous cycle. This ability to learn is as much a gifting as it is a survival mechanism. It’s a resource that should be nurtured and guarded.

Children approach learning with enthusiasm. They see it as an adventure of discovery; to them new knowledge and skills open doors to wonderful new worlds and experiences. When I was a classroom teacher it broke my heart to see the apathy in some students and resentment in others towards education. They wanted the least amount of work possible and hated assignments that demanded anything more from them than the minimum. What happened over their dozen years of life to change their delight in learning to disdain?

I have pondered this question ever since, and even more intently as I begin educating my own children. I have come to the following three conclusions in how to cultivate the posture of the student’s mind towards learning:

  • Make learning a way of life: Once a week I take our schooling to the park. It’s important for the children to see that learning isn’t limited to what happens at the dining room table; it happens continuously. We are always looking for new things to do and try and discuss and I emphasize that we are learning new things. What is learned in our school hour is referred to over and over again throughout the day and week to link school and life. And what we experience throughout the day is mentioned in school to illustrate the need for new tools.
  • The teacher needs to love learning: My attitude is contagious. And as their learning guide I set the tone for our school experience. If I don’t like something, neither will they. If I love something, most likely they will too. But this doesn’t only apply to our school hour; it translates to my personal interests. I read on my own and talk about what I’m reading. I chat with other people and share what I have learned from them. I listen to sermons and podcasts around the kids. I attempt new recipes and practice new skills and tell the kids that I love learning new things. I want them to be excited that there is always more to learn.
  • Beware of fast food learning tools: Just as microwave dinners, bags of chips, and drive-thru burgers taste so delicious and are easy ways to soothe hunger pains, so it is with many common learning tools today. Educational shows, electronic learning devices, and battery-operated toys mesmerize and entertain young minds while sprinkling in ABCs and 1-2-3. Parents breathe a sigh of relief for a moment’s reprieve while feeling satisfied that their kids are learning something. These things can be a fun treat in small doses but if they are the primary educators they will condition a child’s mind to being entertained rather than being challenged and stretched. Learning that lasts comes through tapping into the imagination, hands-on experience and stimulation of all of the senses, not just one or two.

As a teacher I have been given all the tools I need for a successful educational journey: my 5 students. They want to learn. My responsibility is not so much to teach them new things but to cultivate, guide and guard their ability to learn them. I want to fan the flame of their imaginations and ignite the spark of possibility within them: that they can be and do and love and experience all that God wants them to.

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A Philosophy of Education, Part 2: A Student’s Posture Towards God and Man

Last week I introduced the philosophy of education which is guiding me in the instruction of our children. I explained how this philosophy incorporates four heart postures that I wish to cultivate within our little students. The first one is the most critical as it has eternal impact, quickly followed by the second which involves the child’s influence on others.

From a very young age children must learn that they are not their own authority. God is; and their parents are His representatives. This truth is taught through intentional boundaries, consistent discipline and daily instruction in God’s word. Children have a way of testing boundaries and resisting authority and we explain to them that these tendencies reveal the condition of their hearts. They are sinners in need of a Savior. At first this may sound harsh but we do not tell them this to demean them; we explain this to them so that they will seek Jesus as their first love. Our little ones are being immersed in God’s Word. Our children are already learning the Shorter Catechism, the Ten Commandments, and the Fruit of the Spirit. We are reading through the Bible from Genesis to Revelation to help them grow in their familiarity of and love for the Bible. Music is another heartbeat of our home. Every night they listen to classical music or Scripture put to song. I hear them humming these songs to themselves throughout the day. Their commitment to Him will influence all of their future decisions and determine their view of themselves and others: as precious souls created in the image of God, designed to glorify Him and enjoy Him forever.

Their posture towards God: repentant before Him, surrendered to His service and confident of His presence in their lives, shapes their posture towards their fellow man. This is developed in their worldview, an understanding of the world in which they live, both the natural world and the social. Scripture is to be their first guide in helping them to process their convictions and opinions. This is supplemented with other rich literature and frequent family discussions at meals, on walks or before bed. We are also training them in social etiquette, responsibility for the natural world and their possessions, and respect for each other. We want them to see that even now, at the tender ages of 5, 3, and younger, they can bless others and care for the world around them. In order for virtue to be valuable to our children it must be instilled in them while their character is being formed. Norms are established in childhood which is why education is critical.

It’s easy to feel like I am occupying time as I wait for God to show me the great work He has planned for me to do for Him. But I’m beginning to understand that this is that great work. It doesn’t matter if they become doctors or lawyers; I don’t care if they save a million lives or just one. What matters most to me is that all five will love Jesus with their entirety and seek to point others to Him.

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A Philosophy of Education, Part 1: An Introduction

With the advent of our homeschool journey, it seems appropriate to develop and record the philosophy which guides my teaching. I am blessed with a wide range of exposure to academic institutions: home education, community college, private university, state university, public high school, public middle school and Christian middle school. These experiences have introduced me to diverse teaching styles, philosophies and learning strategies. Along the way I have incorporated some into my own philosophy and rejected others. My teaching style is organic, adapting as necessary to the tone of the day; my philosophy, the assembled convictions that guide what I teach, will be a constant as my students and I grow.

It is ironic to observe the evolution of education in America across the centuries. There was a point where schooling was minimal (Abraham Lincoln was self-taught) to now feeling like children must be in preschool for 8 hours a day. The Greatest Generation learned the core subjects and defeated the Axis of Evil; today’s students are receiving sexual preference and tolerance education. Will they be equipped to defeat the next evil which threatens the world? The difference between the victories of then and the weakness of now is that we have gone from teaching how to think to teaching what to think.

My philosophy of education incorporates four postures a student should develop in order to know what he thinks so he can articulate it and act upon it:

  • The posture of the soul towards God: education is meaningless without an assurance of eternity with God
  • The posture of the heart towards man: education is empty unless it benefits mankind and teaches us to do good for our neighbor
  • The posture of the mind towards learning: education has no ending and should be embraced with an eagerness to learn more
  • The posture of the body towards living: education develops a healthy mind that needs a healthy body in which to reside

Over the next few weeks I will expound on these postures and share the vision I hold for my little students.

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To My Little Explorer

It seems appropriate that my blogging topic of the month is exploration since August is your month, my son. All month we have been excitedly planning your birthday and now it is only 3 days away. You have big plans for your fifth year and I have a feeling they will be achieved- because that’s the kind of person you are.

At the cusp of five-years old, your personality is quite defined. You’re a thinker, a planner, a leader, a storyteller, and an explorer. To me, you define boyhood. You are inquisitive in your thoughts; meticulous in your planning (even carrying a little notebook for your plans); enthusiastic in your leadership; detailed in the stories you create and relate to us; and bold in your explorations of the backyard or your own imagination. But something I admire the most about you is your steadiness.

Ever since you were a baby you embraced your own pace. You reached the developmental milestones but always later than the average. Initially I fretted but once I knew you were fine I sat back and enjoyed observing you. You steadily got to where you wanted to go or needed to be. This trait has become your trademark, whether it’s in walking, riding a bike, putting on your belt by yourself, or catching frogs and geckos. And once you achieve your goals, you have them mastered with confidence.

Explorers need that steadiness, Son. They need to be determined in pursuing their dream of discovering the unknown. While you may not discover an unmapped land or encounter a nameless people, there will always be something new to discover about our fathomless God. And as you discover more and more about Him, He will take you to incredible places that will require every ounce of courage you can muster.

We are swiftly entering an era where evil is being called good and good is being called evil. Your peers are going to want to remain in the darkness and will resent you for shining the light of Jesus into their lives. My prayer for you is that your boyhood ideals will mature into the character that will define you as a man: a man who will not minimize what matters nor treat the mysteries of God with indifference. Be bold, young explorer, and never forget to bring your shield.

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Explore the Deep

“Who is man that Thou art mindful of him?” This question, penned thousands of years ago, is still relevant today. I think everyone wants to know who they are, what they are and why they are. I know I do.

I am always asking myself why I hold the aspirations I have; why I’m feeling the way I do; what motivates me and what discourages me; and how I can improve. And then I wonder why I strive so hard only to fail again and again. I know the odds are against me until I’m with Christ in person. It’s easy for me to only see where I fall short, how I’m a stumbling block for others and the long list of should’s scrolling through my head. But that’s where my explorations continue.

As much as I long for perfect contentment I realize it will never happen. I will have moments of perfection but they won’t last. I am an imperfect human who will never achieve the perfection I desire in heart, home or happiness and I can see that that is a good thing. The fruit of my faith is finding God glorified in the mess:

  • feeling the pain of others’ because I’ve felt pain too
  • Refusing a critical spirit because I’m not a perfect mom either
  • Love welling up inside when I see my children in the midst of their fits
  • Learning to slow down and to embrace the slower pace
  • Accepting the shorter to-do list and recognizing that life has still been well lived today
  • Remembering I’ve been here before and will make it through again.

As I question and explore I go deeper into my faith and my God. Who can fathom “the breadth and length and height and depth” of God? It’s in my shortcomings that I’m reminded of the length of His mercy; it’s the desires of my heart that give depth to my prayers; it’s the fears and unknowns that fill me with gratitude for the breadth of His outstretched arms; and when life feels bleak my gaze reaches heavenward.

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A Fresh Look

Exploration means offering yourself opportunities to see things from a different perspective; it means admitting that you don’t know everything; it means being willing to learn something new. Explorers need to be humble because what you discover might shine light on what better ways to live or correct mistakes you didn’t even realize you were making.

Friendship is a fantastic way of encountering a variety of perspectives since every friend has a unique personality, passion and plan for life. I am blessed with friends all over the world and the United States who are seeking to live well. Through them I have learned that my way of living isn’t the only way to live.

Truthfully, I struggle with insecurity fed by pride. I feel like if someone else does something differently than I do it means I’m wrong and if I’m wrong I’m a failure. Jesus is working with me on this and one tool He is using is friendship. This summer He surprised me with an abundance of IN-PERSON visits with beloved friends. Oh! There’s nothing like being able to chat face-to-face! I have also been building brand new friendships and cultivating faithful friendships. In all of these I have discovered a wealth of wisdom for how to live victoriously.

It’s impossible to know all there is to know about teaching, parenting, marriage, loving Jesus, and living well. There simply aren’t enough hours in a lifetime! But you can certainly tag-team life together with quality friends. Here are some exploration tips to go deeper with your friends:

  • Discuss your latest reads
  • Share thoughts on news headlines
  • Swap recipes
  • Brainstorm parenting challenges
  • Be honest about your mishaps
  • Glean new ideas
  • Pray together
  • Provide fashion tips
  • Inspire healthy living habits
  • Build one another up in the faith
  • Hold each other accountable
  • Don’t hesitate to inquire

I am thankful that my friends aren’t just like me. We share similar desires, values and interests but our approaches to living are unique. This provides all of us with a sampling of life experiences that we would otherwise miss. And I’m discovering that doing things differently from others doesn’t mean I’m wrong or a failure. There’s freedom in that discovery.

How have you been enriched by your friendships?

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What? Why? How?

A new month means a new series and this month’s is a prequel to what’s coming in September: education, a theme very close to my heart. I think that a cornerstone of education is exploration: wanting to know the what’s, why’s, and how’s of existence on this planet called earth.

Children are born with an innate desire to explore. Everything is new to them and guiding their explorations can make the world a brand new place for their teachers. Every first is a new first for me with each child: the first encounter with bubbles makes bubbles all the more wonderful; the first look at the Christmas tree is more magical each year; the first trip to the zoo is greater in its excitement. And as their vocabulary grows and minds develop the discoveries do too.

“How does the soap dispenser open up in the dishwasher?”

“What makes cars move?”

“Why do bees pollinate?”

“Where does the water go when it goes down the drain?”

“How does bacteria get inside of us?”

“What is an idol?”

“Why do bad guys have birthdays?”

“How can a bad guy love Jesus?”

Each question makes me explore the world a little deeper myself. I realize that I have settled with what I already know while life beckons with greater mysteries I have yet to discover. I have an inkling that there are many great adventures ahead as the exploring continues- both in our physical world and in our faith.

Is there still an explorer within your heart?

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Freedom in God Glorified

We have that phrase memorized: “…that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” I remember teaching the Declaration of Independence to my middle school students and explaining that the right to pursue happiness does not give us a license to do whatever we want at the expense of someone else’s rights. It does mean that we have the right to seek a fulfilled life and experience the freedom that is ours as citizens of a great nation. That freedom might look differently than what we would expect.

I have observed how much I struggle to keep myself in front and center – even in my spiritual life. My prayers focus on me or matters concerning those closest to me:

“Give me wisdom (or strength or peace or joy)”

“Heal them”

“Protect us”

“Help me”

And in the midst of the trials, whether they be minor irritants or major suffering my attention is on how they are affecting me and diminishing my personal comfort. It is natural for a human to be aware of himself above all; it defines the Christian to seek God glorified above all.

The Christian will find ultimate freedom in seeking Christ’s interest before his own. Since my heart has been enlightened to this truth I have been actively raising my gaze heavenward when the demands of the temporal clamor loudest.

When I am fatigued and don’t know if I’ll last through the day I seek God glorified.

When my back is aching and there’s still dinner to prepare I seek God glorified.

When my husband and I see differently on an issue I seek God glorified.

When 5 of my 5 children are screaming or being defiant all at once I seek God glorified.

When the two-year old needs to be potty-trained I seek God glorified.

When my tongue yearns to criticize or judge I seek God glorified.

When the future is overwhelming I seek God glorified.

When I’ve been hurt and bitterness beckons I seek God glorified.

God provides the storm and God provides the blessing. Our prayer in the heart of the storm should not be for it to abate but for God to be glorified in how we weather it. The blessing comes not when the storm is over but in how our conduct throughout the storm brought praise and glory to our God.

How gloriously freeing to no longer consider myself in this life but in all things to pursue God glorified!

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Freedom in Embracing Rest

I have a thought to share: God designed pockets of rest into our daily existence. Why is this significant to me? Because I don’t slow down unless I am forced to be still. However, with this new baby I am guarding his feeding times as a chance to sneak away and savor rather than multitasking during his care. That’s what prompted these thoughts on rest and the freedom therein.

I view rest as a luxury, something I can only do if there is absolutely nothing else to do. Even when I am being still I feel I need to grab a book or pick up my phone. I save baby snuggles or playtime with the children as a relaxing incentive to get all my other things done while those restful times of fun are highlights of my day. Reading, journaling, sipping tea and seeing, sitting outside and thinking, these are all favorite forms of rest that I am always hoping to do when I have a spare moment.

But God designed us for rest which makes it as much of a necessity as respiration and food. And when there is a balance of rest and work we thrive! Take note of those little moments to be still: the bathroom breaks, sitting down to a meal, tucking children in bed, waiting in line at a grocery store, walking the dog… what can you add to the list?

There is freedom in embracing God’s perfect design. When we rest we can see beyond the surface clutter of the busy moment. Delight in rest!

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Freedom in Authenticity

I write for two reasons:

  1. To write- it’s how I process life. As soon I could fluently put sentences on paper I have been writing and I have a journal collection as witness.
  2. To testify to God’s faithfulness- He has called me to be His servant and He works mightily in my life. I must declare what He does.

And that is why I am writing today. I am not writing to flaunt my weaknesses or to seek advice; it would be easy to blog about my ideals and skew my words in order to imply that my life aligns with them perfectly. But it doesn’t. I struggle.

Most days it seems like the trials seize control. These postpartum emotions are all too real; they stalk me, taunt my inadequacies, and threaten to conquer when I am at my lowest point. Without them I would bravely face my husband’s work trips, not lose my cool with incessant harmonica playing and not sit on the floor sobbing after the one-year old pours a can of pee (don’t ask!) on himself and later locks himself in his room. I would roll my eyes in exasperation at the continual clutter surrounding me but not despair; I would feel blessed by having dogs and kids velcroed to my side all day (well, maybe blessed is too saintly a description).

I often lie awake at night reflecting on my day and regretting every lost opportunity for filling memories with love and gentleness rather than impatience, anger and harsh tones. My eyes will tear up with immense love for the little people that were so exasperating during nap time or went to bed screaming just moments before. I feel shame for even having this postpartum struggle because I should “know better.”

As real as these postpartum lows are Christ is greater than their reality. After a stressful nap time He reminds me that there can be bedtime snuggles. During a long night He soothes me with the thought that tomorrow is a fresh start. And after a desperate mother’s prayerful plea for help with a locked door, it swung open- reminding me that in the loneliest moments I am not alone.

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Freedom Under a Watchful Eye

It was that first act of defiance in the face of GOD so long ago that forever altered our DNA. Defiance towards our Creator is now our default and our nature demands the anointing of self as king rather than the King of kings. We shun submission, scorn surrender and scoff at servitude to the Almighty God, never pausing to consider the very fact of our existence in the first place. At what point before we existed did you or I determine our own conception? We loftily think that exercising our free will defines our freedom; in reality, it is we who forge our own chains.

Not long ago I gained a better understanding of this concept of freedom when I observed my two-year old at the splash park. She was reluctant to venture out but after some coaxing she attempted a new part of the play area on her own. As she was climbing the stairs, she paused and scanned for my face. Once she saw I was watching, she smiled and went forward with more spring in her step. In that moment I recognized that my freedom is found, not when I’m on my own, doing things my way, but when I’m in the presence of God. Under His love-filled gaze I can enjoy and explore life, confident that He will guide and prompt me as He deems best.

Our society revolts against God at every turn. It is driven by emotions , follows the heart and worships self- all of which lead only to destruction. Ironically, the freedom we seek is found in dethroning self and pledging allegiance to our Maker.

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Discovering Freedom

July. The year is more than halfway to its completion but it seems like yesterday when we celebrated a festive Christmas season. And yet time has continued its steady tread to a destination only known by God. I ponder man’s relationship with time and the unquenchable yearning for something other than what we have.

Freedom. There are many nuances to this concept and this month I plan to unwrap some of those nuances. I am sure our immediate image of freedom is one of fireworks on the Fourth of July, but even that has deeper meanings than is usually considered. We say it’s our nation’s birthday but when was the last time we dug into the history books and relived the incredible sacrifices of those who birthed this land?

Freedom. Is it the permission to do whatever we want? Does the pursuit of happiness give us license to indulge in every whim and fancy stemmed from an avoidance of want and pain? And what if your desire inhibits my sense of freedom? What then? These are questions that only lead back to the ultimate Source of freedom and a recognition that the only chains worth considering are the chains that stretch into eternity.

Freedom. The absence of fear. A clear conscience. Peace with who I am. A foundation of unshakable joy in the midst of great sorrow or intense depression. An assurance that my sin debt has been paid in full by Jesus Christ. The knowledge that the Almighty God knows my name.

Freedom to live and work and play and worship without fear of imprisonment, torture or death is priceless. But the freedom that comes through a saving relationship with our Creator God is infinitely greater.

How would you describe freedom?

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Quiet in the Loud

Perhaps it’s because I’m so desirous of rest that it seems elusive; or maybe I’m aware of the need to practice rest and therefore am more conscious of where I’m lacking in that discipline. On this particular weekend I caught both glimpses of how I should be and why it is difficult for me to remain in that restful state of mind.

Our family took a day trip and despite the challenges that arise when taking #5under5 on a mini road trip and away from their routines, I was peaceful. Just 24 hours later I was bombarded with all the details of managing our household and found it incredibly daunting. Why the change in my peace?

During my devotions this morning I believe that God revealed the missing link: rest and peace come when I tune into the quiet voice of Jesus more than the clamor of my responsibilitiesTo keep Jesus the focus of my gaze is much easier said than done; however, that needs to be the goal of each day rather than my to-do list or parenting or my marriage. When I am striving with life on my own strength even the littlest task can appear insurmountable but when I make Him the center of each moment even a mountain is moveable.

Once again I have encountered the truth that quiet can be found in the loud, rest in the midst of busy and peace in the eye of the storm.

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Relaxation Discoveries

I’m feeding the baby as I write this; the older kids are attempting to do their morning chores but the sounds emanating from the dining room indicate that chores have turned into play. My husband’s summer vacation time hasn’t turned into quite the stay-cation I had anticipated. I had envisioned endless hours of family play and local discoveries; home projects being accomplished swiftly and daily routines being perfected.

Instead we have just been getting by. The baby is still unpredictable in his sleep patterns and our morning chores barely get done before it’s lunch time. Our summer bucket list continues to wait on us and the home projects multiply exponentially. Can relaxation be found in the cacophony of demands upon our time and energy?

It is possible but it’s a life skill that needs practice, and I’m a long way from being perfect in it. I tend to think that I need to plan ahead for times of relaxation and to prepare for fun. But upon further reflection of our summer thus far I see that we have had good times: father and son fishing in our lake; a spontaneous family tickle fight before bed; lingering over breakfast; ordering take out and watching a movie after the kids are in bed. We have had deep family conversations and turned doctor appointments into mini road trips with snacks and books and country music. So what makes the difference between regular life and relaxed life?

While rest is pausing to breathe, I think that relaxation is a focused determination to breathe levity into the ordinary. It’s a matter of attitude and expectations: anything can be joyful with the proper perspective. My husband reminds me that this season of #5under5 is a time of taking life in small doses. There will be many things we simply cannot do right now but relaxation doesn’t have to be one of them. I’m going to keep practicing.

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The Mystery of Rest

I am not third trimester tired anymore since I can actually sleep when I have the chance to sleep. But I am still tired. On average, I am operating on 4 hours of sleep a day. If the baby sleeps, most likely someone else will be waking up during the night. And when morning comes I have to will my eyes to open and my body to leave the bed.

This morning my emotions were pretty low. My husband was at work, there were 5 babies to feed, dogs to walk, laundry to wash, a blog to write and texts needing answering. I wanted to cry (and probably did a little). Could I rewind to the day after delivery so I could stay in bed all day without guilt? I just wanted to rest a little longer.

And then my thoughts moved to a higher plane. Perhaps there is a way to rest mindfully if not physically. Perhaps it’s the mind that craves a peaceful state more than our bodies desire a horizontal state. And then I thought about my precious newborn. Left alone on his back he flails and cries and does not rest. But as soon as I pick him up and snuggle him with his arms and legs tucked under him and his body close to mine, he relaxes and sleeps.

I think that’s a picture of me too. On my own my mind and heart flail in panic at all that is required of me. My strength is inadequate for the intensity of my responsibilities. The more I flail the more exhausted I become. But if I draw near to Jesus and listen to His heart I can find rest in the midst of the labor. And if my heart is peaceful I can rest in the center of the chaos.

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Susanna Wesley: The Mother of John and Charles Wesley

This biography by Arnold A. Dallimore is a succinct overview of a strong, gifted, intelligent, yet under appreciated woman. Dallimore uses extensive research of letters and other books to reveal a woman who suffered a lifetime of tragedy and disappointment. In spite of all that she endured, this heroine of the faith poured her life into raising her children with intentionality, often alone and in poverty, and in the process encountered a new level of faith in her Savior. Her heart is echoed in her prayer “that God would make me better and take me at the best.”

Posted in Annotated Book List, Book Reviews | 3 Comments

The Richness in Rest

It’s June! Summer! A season of rest and relaxation. Ahhhh! Resting has been a theme of mine in these postpartum weeks. I am discovering that rest is actually a discipline; I thought it would be much easier to slow down than it has been. But that is not the only thing I’ve recently discovered.

I have long considered Susanna Wesley, mother of the famous sibling duo: John and Charles Wesley, a role model. I knew she was the mother of 19 children, had taught them at home and was intentional about spending individual time with them during the week. I was eager to learn more about this incredible woman of history and devoured Arnold A. Dillamore’s biography about her. I was startled to discover how little I really knew about her.

She had birthed 19 children in 19 years but buried 9 of them in infancy or shortly thereafter; her house burned twice and each time she and her children barely made it out alive; her husband was often indifferent or even hostile towards her, overlooked many of her and her daughters’ basic needs and even deserted her for half a year; for much of her life she did not have the beautiful assurance of her salvation.

And yet in all of this she remained strong, gracious, and committed to nurturing her children and pursuing a deeper understanding of Christ. The desperate situations in which she was often placed did not diminish her determination to live well and invest in raising her children up in the fear and admonition of the Lord. As I closed this book for the last time I was inspired to be slower in defining any hardship as such and instead to invest my energies in gratitude, intentional parenting and a diligent pursuit of Christ.

At the same time that I was establishing a better acquaintance with Susanna Wesley I was also blessed with the opportunity to show hospitality to my parents. They came to support us in the transition from 4 children to 5 and went above and beyond to do just that. I anticipated their arrival and stay with a degree of reluctance. But it only took a short time to prove my reluctance unfounded. They poured themselves out for me and mine: cleaning and repairing the house, caring for our pets, preparing meals and spending hour after hour playing with and reading to our children. They sacrificed their time and energy so that I could have the gift of rest.

As I closed the front door after their departure the truth settled into my heart that intentional parenting is a lifetime commitment. Susanna Wesley corresponded fervently with her children in their adult years; she did not cease in her interest or involvement with their lives. And so has the role of my parents evolved. While they no longer need to train, discipline or provide for me, their presence and involvement in my life is just as crucial. They offer support, insights and encouragement that is unique to their position as parents and grandparents.

I was able to grasp these new discoveries because I took time to rest. The discipline of intentional rest for body and mind allows for restoration and enrichment that busyness neglects. This month our family is going to take life slower than usual and I will share my insights along the way.

What are your favorite ways to rest and relax?

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Five

Life is a series of journeys. There are the ones that cross the paths of two individuals that result in the journey of fertilized egg reaching the uterus. And the pregnancy journey that mother and child embark upon- each step, each day, each mile marker that is laboriously achieved as they grow and change together. It culminates in that pivotal new life journey of birth.

This week my fifth child and I made that defining journey. Each birth has opened my eyes and heart to a fresh dimension of deeper living and this one was no exception. Through 7.5 hours of active labor the aspect of time disappeared for me. At first I was anxiously aware of the comfort and schedules of everyone around me. But as the serenity of the ambient light, the wild orange being diffused, the pictures of our wedding and our children on the walls, seeped into my consciousness I embraced the letting go of time.

Reflecting back upon the freshest birthday in our family I see that an awareness of time gives me a sense of control that I actually don’t have. Presence of mind in the moment brought me through the birth and allowed me to recognize the process of birth more than I ever have before. That is the kind of presence I want to have in every moment granted to me with my loved ones.

Time moves whether my eye is on the clock or not; how I live that time is what impacts the journey. Awaiting the birth of this baby was heavy on my mind for the past ten months and now it is two days in the past. Such a transformative, miraculous event for me and him that will never happen again but because I was THERE it is imprinted in my memory forever. And the living continues; I want to be just as present for the miracles yet to come.

Your journeys are different from mine. The journey that began your life story or your child’s life story might be a painful one; but that doesn’t mean the journeys to follow aren’t worth taking. God uses time to rescue, renew and restore. Choose to let the life journey continue.

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Serenity

There’s a family of Canadian geese that have residence in the lake behind our home. I never weary of watching them or they me, for that matter! When I’m hanging up laundry the entire goose clan glides over to float and gaze. It makes me smile. I am also intrigued by the formation of the goose family when they are swimming: parent leading, offspring in a row, parent bringing up the rear. And they swim calmly to and from their destination. There is serenity in the order.

Our little ones are not quite as compliant as those goslings when it comes to routine in and out of the house. We frequently meet with resistance as we instruct them in etiquette and attitude. But they do know who their authority figures are and, even more importantly, they are secure enough in their relationship with us to be authentic. Their emotions are never hidden from us: anger, jubilation, fear, hurt, gratitude…whatever they are feeling overflows unashamedly. And the questions they pose! Those come with zero filter. If they don’t know or understand something, they simply ask. If they would like something, they ask. If they can’t remember, they ask. There is serenity in authentic relationship.

And it always brings me back to Jesus. I realize that I hide many of my true feelings from Him. When anxiety overpowers, I try to reason with it, fight it, or ignore it on my own rather than simply talking it all out with Jesus. I hesitate to bring requests to Him because they either seem too insignificant or too impossible; if I don’t understand something I wrestle with it on my own rather than coming to Him for clarity. But as I wait and wait and wait on this Baby I am coming to the end of myself and God is prompting me to let go of myself and go deeper with Him. He reminds me that I can calmly follow Him and be raw at the same time. He wants me to acknowledge that He knows the true me; I don’t have to hide from Him. There is serenity in letting go.

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The Book Nook

There’s a favorite little person hangout in our home. It’s a raised brick corner that displays our Christmas tree in December. When it came time to undecorate this year, many tears were shed about the tree having to go. We promised a surprise in place of the tree and the Book Nook happened. There are mismatched pillows, a quilt my grandmother sewed, cheerful puppet friends, and baskets of books. A string of lights outlines the perimeter of the Nook. On a daily basis one, two, three or four children can be found snuggling there, lights on, books piled on laps.

Our little ones are too young to read words (although the oldest is on the cusp). Their reading consists of studying minute details of every illustration on every page, discussing the details and retelling the story as it was read to them. They will study the same books over and over and over again until the pictures and basic plot are memorized. They beg to have the stories read again so they can remember more of the details on their own.

And the stories, as well as the characters occupying them, are interwoven in daily conversation and play. Their avid imaginations latch on to the plots and expand upon them, reflect upon them, learn from them and grow. It doesn’t matter if the book is history, science, math, or fiction. As long as it is a book with detailed illustrations it is absorbed.

Yesterday a friend sent me a Polo message and in it she read Psalm 147 aloud to me. This Psalm was filled with descriptions of God and as I listened my heart soared in praise. I realized that my trials and worries are small in light of the nature of God. And as I reflected on the writing of this blog I recognized my need to absorb more details about Jesus. The more I learn about Him the more I will know Him and long to worship Him. He will be interwoven into my day and shape my perception of life. What I pour into my mind shapes my thoughts, attitudes and interactions; just as I’m intentional about cultivating my children’s habits and attitudes, I need to do the same with my own.

How much time do you spend reading each day? What do you like to read?

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Oh! The Anticipation!

All throughout the month of April anticipation for May bubbled up and spilled over. The little ones would eagerly ask me if May was “after this day?” and my reply would be, “Not yet but soon!” Can you imagine their delight when May truly was “after this day”? Why the excitement? Because Baby Pover (‘puh-ver’) is arriving in May.

The last night of April was an eventful one- between restless leg syndrome, head-to-toe itching, painful contractions and a little one throwing up I got very little rest. But as I tucked everyone back in bed after cleaning up the sick one, our oldest son eagerly whispered to me, “It’s almost May!” I went back to bed and let my mind dwell on that fact and the thrill of anticipation that comes so naturally to children. It’s true! This new baby is coming any time between today and May 27th. I can bemoan that it will probably be later than sooner; I can be frustrated with all the false starts and stops (telling a mom at this stage in pregnancy to not analyze every sensation as labor possibly beginning will be as successful as telling a golden retriever not to wag his tail); I can dwell on the ever increasing discomfort and lengthening days (at this point one day is the equivalent of a week); or I can embrace the anticipation! Any day now because May is here!

And so it is with Jesus. The Bible tells us that He is returning to gather up His own and there will be a new heaven and a new earth! The Bible makes frequent references to the travail of labor and the delight of new life. It makes mention of birth pangs and the earth groaning like a woman in childbirth. Just as I am ready to be free of pregnancy pain and to behold my new child, so am I ready to be free of the burden of daily sin – my own and what surrounds me – and to behold my Lord and Savior. But rather than bemoan the waiting I want to rejoice in the anticipation and make the most of every opportunity to live well and prepare for His return.

This month’s blog series will be focused on Heart and Home. I would like to share with you little peeks into our family’s daily life and also share spiritual reflections that Jesus has placed upon my heart. We will chat more next week (if Pover hasn’t appeared yet!).

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Risks and Rewards

Four weeks of blogging on friendship cannot encapsulate the many nuances of this topic: the types, styles and dynamics. Reflecting upon the many people I have called friends through the years brings a smile (and some tears) to my face. My friendships have crossed cultures, world views and generations. They have opened my eyes to the value of vulnerability.

Leaving my home state and subsequently, my comfort zone, to settle in another left me wondering if I could possibly establish community where I had no prior connections or history. Upon moving into our new neighborhood, my family and I did the following:

  • Found a church: it wasn’t until we connected with the family of God that I really began to feel at home. My husband insisted we get involved with the church right away and soon fresh friendships were forming.
  • Waved to our neighbors: there is something about waving and smiling to the people that pass by every day on walks or drives that builds connections which lead to conversations.
  • Bread and tea: at Christmas I made bread for our neighbors that we delivered in person. Doors and hearts always open to freshly baked bread. In the months and chats that followed I put Tea at Two on my social calendar, as well as a Hobby Night, and now a few of my neighbors come over regularly to chat, laugh, pray and support one another.

The rewards of friendship are countless. There’s the intrigue that comes with meeting lovely people in unexpected ways and listening to their profound life stories; there’s the joy and love that come from building new connections and being embraced by folks you never knew existed a handful of years ago; and there’s the security that comes from not being invisible in your own community. But the risks are also real.

I have had my share of hurt in friendship- some being quite fresh. To have friends, one must be vulnerable and real and that provides ample opportunity for rejection and betrayal. Friends know your history, your weaknesses, your hopes and dreams; you assume they are a safe place. But friends are also human and susceptible to misunderstandings, offenses, jealousies, the comparison game, and a myriad of other weaknesses that destroy relationships. How does one navigate these risks?

As I conclude my friendship series, I wish I could provide a succinct answer. Unfortunately, I’m no friendship expert. All I know is that in a world of chaos and evil I am thankful for the people I call friends. I am blessed by their life experience, their kindness and their availability. I am inspired by them to be a good friend and a true friend- someone that people depend upon. But because I am just as human as the next soul, I know I can’t be a friend without Jesus. I have to lean into Him for the wisdom and guidance needed to multiply the joy and process the sorrow of friendship.

How do you navigate the risks and rewards of friendships?

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Even From a Distance

Having been raised in Hawaii long distance friendships were normal for me and correspondence became a way of life. My pen pals ranged in age from 80 to 5, some I had chatted with in person and some I had never met before, some were in other countries and some were just states away. I learned about friendship cultivation through these letters.

  • Share the details. The friendships that flourished were the ones where our letters were filled with every day tidbits, decorated with stickers and doodling, and even had jokes going back and forth. We moved past the mundane facts and chatted in pen as if we were in person.
  • Share my heart. It takes effort to open up long distance but the sharing of struggles and emotions crosses the miles. Friendships do not deepen without vulnerability.
  • Take the time. I really tried to make my correspondence a weekly priority and had set days when I replied to my letters in the order they came. I wrote to my elderly penpals weekly, regardless if they had written back. Sometimes I would surprise my friends with little gifts in their letters.

With the advancement of technology, letter writing is a fading practice; even emails are becoming obsolete thanks to text messaging, Facebook messenger, Marco Polo, Snapchat, Instagram and all the other social media sites that connect people. In my opinion though, social media requires us to work even harder to cultivate friendship.

As we inform the masses of our life happenings we lose the personal closeness that comes with sitting down to write to ONE person or picking up the phone and having a chat with ONE person (something that I’m terrible at initiating since I have a phobia of phone calls. LOL!) The tidbits I learned so long ago about cultivating friendships across the miles may have been learned through letter writing but are still relevant in this social media driven world. We still need to share details, share our hearts and take time to be a good friend.

What is your preferred method for cultivating long distance friendships?

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The ‘I’ in Friend

Selflessness is at the heart of friendship but there is also value in simply being yourself. I genuinely struggled with this as I exited the blissful oblivion of childhood and became more self-aware. Through my childhood and teenage years I experienced significant rejection from my peers which resulted in the majority of my friendships being with those older and younger than myself. I longed for social circle of peers but God opened my eyes to the richness of friends in stages of life that differed from mine.

My husband was the first peer who sought me out for who I was (so of course i married him! lol!). He invested great effort in learning about me, valuing my thoughts and ideas, and delighting in who I am as an individual. It took me a while to believe that someone as amazing as him would enjoy my company (and sometimes I still can’t believe it) but through his cultivation I discovered a confidence in friendship I had never before experienced. Thus began a new and exciting season of friendship for me.

Since our marriage I have developed a handful of intimate friendships that have grown and challenged me. These women offer support in the hard times, celebrate the victories and offer accountability in weakness. Our friendship isn’t without ruffled feathers and emotional outbursts but we have learned to trust one another’s hearts. And I am recognizing that when I am honestly me we grow even closer because they can be honestly them. There is humility and freedom in being yourself, isn’t there?

In a nutshell, friendship begins with me being me. This doesn’t mean I can glory in self-absorption or expect everyone to cater to my whims and fancies; rather, it means I am not ashamed of my strengths; I’m honest about my weaknesses; I don’t apologize for my convictions; and I celebrate my interests. In turn, I encourage my friends to do the same.

What holds you back in friendship?

In the weeks ahead I hope to share about cultivating long distance friendships and beginning new friendships in new communities. (I’ll be blogging until Baby comes)

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Building Sound Friendships

Is it already a new month? Wow! And a new month means a new theme of blogs. I would like to take time to focus on friendship. Friendship is vital for a socially fulfilled life and it refines us as we strive to love our neighbors as we love ourselves. Without friends, we would have fewer opportunities to practice selflessness.

Background: over the past two years I have experienced friendship in fresh ways. I went through a decently traumatic ending to a friendship, made new friendships and cultivated continuing ones. At the same time, my oldest two children entered the stage of desiring friendships of their one and observing them make their entrance into the social community has been fascinating for me.

Looking ahead: I have come to recognize that while I am the common denominator in all of my friendships I am still only responsible for my own words, actions and attitudes. I can not force others to see things my way, respond the way I want them to or live their lives according to my value system. I am not responsible for who they are as individuals. This is simultaneously freeing and challenging concept for me, and I hope to explore it in more detail in this month’s blog series.

I welcome your thoughts, reflections and personal experiences along the way.

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Facing the Truth

The beauty of the gospel is that it reveals the evil within us, declares our need for a savior and points us to Him. This month and this journey through the Matthew, Mark, Luke and John have found me pondering the impact of the gospel in my daily life more than I ever have before.

Yesterday I had an invigorating discussion with my gentle neighbor regarding our sinful state and just how profound it is to know that the Creator of the Universe put such thought and sacrifice into providing a way for us to be reconciled to and have a relationship with Him, even before we even desired such restoration! And I am thankful for this!

You see, despite having repented of my sins and embracing Jesus as my Lord and Savior, I continue to sin each and every day. This week has been particularly hard. Last night I was in tears over the impatience in my heart towards my children. I love them beyond description and yet even that great love does not prevent me from sinning against them. And that prompted me to ponder the love of Jesus. It was His great love for me that moved Him to endure a brutal death before I showed any sign of repentance. It’s humbling. It’s freeing. It’s beautiful.

March is drawing to a close and so is this theme of blogs. I pray that I will continue to bring the gospel into all that I think, say and do, that my gratitude for Christ’s sacrifice will prompt me to be bold in sharing the truth with others and that I will humbly show grace and forgiveness every day just as they have been shown to me.

How will the gospel impact you today?

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Fear or Faith

Does fear define you? What are your top five fears: fear of failure, fear of disappointment, fear of disapproval, fear of…?

My husband and I were chatting about what prevents us from sharing the truth of the gospel with our friends. Oftentimes it is the fear of losing the friendship that keeps our mouths shut. Dare I say this is a valid fear? After all, isn’t religion one of this topics you don’t discuss at a dinner party? People rarely jump at the chance to talk about their sins, their eternal destination or their standing before the Almighty God. It is human nature to put God in a box and when someone dares to open that box it is rarely met with applause.

However valid our fear may be of sharing the gospel does it condone our silence? Only if we do not genuinely believe in Jesus; only if He is NOT God; only if He did not actually live, die and resurrect; only if our sins do not need to be forgiven; only if Jesus is not worth living (and dying) for; only if today matters more than eternity; only if our temporary comfort is of more pertinence than God’s glory.

Trust me, I am no pro at sharing the gospel with everyone I meet. My prayer is that as I grow in my love for Jesus so will my love grow for my neighbors and that love will compel me to share the hope that is within me.

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To Shilo: Upon the Eve of his First Birthday

‘To amaze: fill with astonishment; astound, take someone’s breath away…’

As we prepare to step into your second year of life and bid babyhood an official farewell, amazement provides the best description for my first year with you.  The first birthdays of all of your siblings have brought me to tears with how fast they passed, but yours seems to have gone faster than all the rest. I can vividly remember the details of your birth and ask myself, “Has it already been one year? So long and yet so brief!”

Your birth amazed me! Yours was our first home birth and because of that an aura of warmth and peace surrounds its memory. Each time we walk in our neighborhood I recall the labor walk to encourage contractions; the little patch of carpet in our room where you made your grand entrance floods my heart with joy and I don’t even mind that blood stain on the bed where I eased into it with you fresh in my arms. Such a journey of pain, power, and priceless life!

Your development amazes me! First it was your rapid growth – at 2 weeks old you were nearly the size of a 6-week old and at your 8-week wellness check the doctor could only shake her head in astonishment at how large you were. You rapidly outgrew every outfit we had and by the time you were 10-months you were wearing 18-month clothing. You crawled faster, pulled up faster and acquired teeth faster than everyone else in addition to growing so fast. Now it is your cognitive development that amazes me. The way you already drive cars with your thumb and forefinger like your big brother does and make the car sounds as you drive; the way you make eye contact, grunt, and attempt syllables to communicate with us; the deliberate way in which you participate in your siblings activities and look at books with them all indicate a very intelligent individual.

Your features amaze me! Your soft, wispy hair that can’t make up its mind about being dark or light brown begs to be caressed. The rolls on your arms and legs and the way your little toes grip the carpet when you stand up are irresistable on the cuteness scale. Your one-dimple smile and the way you cock your head to the side when you want to make me melt  work every time!

Your personality amazes me! The way you lay your head in my neck to snuggle when I pick you up make time pause for a breath. You can’t help but beat time with the music when your favorite songs are playing and you wave your arms when we say, “Hallelujah, He arose!” You are gentle and strong, determined and dependent. Somehow you manage to be a baby and a little boy all at once.

Your place in the family amazes me! It’s clear that at this young age you already adore your family. You have a unique relationship with each one of us, including the pets. You are fourth in the sibling ranks but that doesn’t lessen the importance of your role in our lives. Each of your siblings adores you and Poppa and Mama can’t get enough of your snuggles. Our family would be incomplete without your presence.

Happy birthday, my Son! God amazes me through you.

 

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The Widow’s Mite

Gospel-living is becoming a theme in the day-to-day, not just in March’s blogs, and I am delighted with this. It is not so easy to be delighted with what brings the theme to mind, however: hardship. Not life-shattering hardship as is happening all around the world, but trials in the little things. For the most part it’s just life not going my way or the way I think would be best. Why, I do not even do things the way I think would be best!!

But this morning I read the account of the widow’s mite in the gospel according to Luke. It sums up gospel-living: hold nothing back. Jesus tells us to pick up our cross and follow Him; then He commends the widow for giving, not out of her surplus, but everything she had. This same principle carriers into how we treat those who hurt us, how we respond to injustice and how we approach difficulty in our day-to-day. It is a continual giving of our entire selves to obedience to Jesus. Why? Because that is what we as Christians claim matters most to us. Do our lives declare it? Only if we are all in (as my pastor likes to say).

For me, this applies when my energy is depleted but the demands increase or when friends hurt me or when I feel like my situation isn’t fully understood. I should respond with grace and gentleness towards people and within my own heart. It’s in how I respond to life not going my way that I live out the gospel for those around me; after all, if I had things my way from the beginning I would never have sworn allegiance to Christ in the first place. I am thankful He intervened.

When is it the hardest for you to live out the gospel?

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Living for the Kingdom

Seeing March on the calendar reminds me that spring is on the way. Spring draws my attention to Easter and Easter brings the gospel into the forefront of my mind. Truthfully, I should live very day in light of Christ’s call and sacrifice, but I don’t. I am journeying through the gospels with a friend of mine and in some ways it feels like I am hearing Jesus’s words for the very first time. It is both convicting and refreshing. Luke chapter 12 has had a particularly lasting effect on me.

In this passage Jesus relates the parable of the wealthy man who had such abundance he decided to tear down his barns and build bigger ones. God curses him for being so confident in himself and his wealth and the man died that very night. Jesus goes on to urge His followers to not worry about such things as food and clothing for those things do not have eternal value; instead, we should center our lives on what has eternal consequences. I don’t believe Jesus is saying that it is wrong to enjoy good food, tasteful clothing, a cozy house, fun vacations or any of those things that delight us throughout the day; He is saying that they should not consume our thoughts more than He does. And that convicted me.

As I read I realized that my thoughts are generally about temporal concerns like meal preparations, clothing purchases, finances, how much time I’ve spent on my phone, or whether or not I’ve offended a friend. Again, these things aren’t inherently bad, but when I’m dwelling on them I’m not seeking the Kingdom. And if I’m pursuing Kingdom matters earthly things suddenly won’t matter so much. What does this look like in practical terms?

This is a question I’ll be pondering all month and perhaps even longer. I know that I want to talk to and about Jesus more every day; I want to obey His promptings immediately; when I begin to worry about something material I want to ask myself if it will matter when I’m seeing Jesus face-to-face. I would like to be more interested in what God is doing in the lives of others and their efforts to share the gospel with those around them.

This month’s posts will be focused on gospel-living. How do you seek to bring the gospel into your every day living? What temporal concerns tend to dominate your thoughts?

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What It Takes to be Kind

“Have you ever felt tossed back and forth, trying to please people in different worlds, searching for an anchor to hold you steady?” This is a question posed by Lara Casey in chapter 4 of her book, Make It Happen. I asked myself, “Well, have I?” My initial reaction is, “Of course not!” But then I read chapter 7 of Luke in which Jesus directly commends three people, from very different walks of life, for their faith. I realized that not only have I been tossed back and forth in search of an anchor, I still am.

How do I know this? I know this because I am easily swayed by circumstances, opinions and temporal interests and desires rather than being devoted to Who and what I know to be true. When those factors change, I change. If things are aligned correctly and are favorable to my preferences, I am pleasant to all who cross my path; but it’s a different story when I am disgruntled with my place in the world. Alternatively, if my eyes and heart remained anchored to Jesus and my pleading tears of repentance washed His feet, life would be noticeably different; it would be lush with the fruit that comes only from abiding in Him. Temporal trends would not impact how I respond to others and I would have insight into how to minister to the living beings who share the world with me.

This month of love is drawing to a close. I can’t say that I’ve aced all the tests of loving responses and serving with kindness that have come my way. In fact, my eyes have been opened to how much I can improve as I’ve been blessed with unexpected kindnesses from loved ones and strangers alike. But as a new month approaches, I plan to redouble my efforts to abide in Jesus and share the fruit that comes from an anchored life.

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